Marie Jose - Various - Heartbeat Soukous (Cassette)

So, they are not governed by the spirit of God, or Jah. Q: When you did these great lyrics, did you sit down and work them out or….

A: That song came very quick, usually in those days songs came very quick to me, just like you hear the riddim, listen the riddim, and then [snaps his fingers] the inspiration just come. A: Yeah [pants several times]! And Scratch laugh and say he running from something, police want him or something.

A: Yeah. I think it was Horsemouth [Leroy Wallace] playing a little melody. You mean the world to me. It never press a lot but it a good song. It sound good. It could have sold a lot if I had press more. That was a nice one too. DJ version. A: [laughing] Jim Screechy mean when a man coming up on you dodging. Hide and seeking. Not coming up full to you. Chat behind your back. So me say never do them thing deh. A righteous Rasta man never deal with that.

Me and Scratch mostly used to put things together by-clipping through things that happening and take things from it. We do Colombia Colly and then we do a lot more Marie Jose - Various - Heartbeat Soukous (Cassette), which is where I gone and do my thing from Marie Jose - Various - Heartbeat Soukous (Cassette). And just hang on until now. He lift up my eyes onto the hills from whence come my help. I have come from Jah which made heaven on earth.

By his protection the sun shall not smite me by day nor the moon by night. My group. And later for Rupie Edwards me and Joe Higgs sing it and he say him write it. I saw a canoe passing, which him row with two stick. The old-time canoe, they row them with stick. Me used to love the sea Sunday morning time. Where it come from. They only sing it. And gone home.

And the Congoes record it and say it is them write it. I have a lot of songs that I write which I never get credit for because I never know much about performing rights. But the rights of them, the original work, is mine. But we do some great works at Upsetter studio. Nuff songs. Nuff song that people create them not even know where it come from. Scratch always had enough words. He called me Jah Lion. But he called me Jah Lion different from Jah Lloyd…. This interview was first published in The Beat in DanceCrasher would like to thank Mike Turner for giving us the opportunity to reproduce it.

Respect to Jah Lion. Francis began his singing career with the Mediators in the mids. At the end of the decade, he recorded for Rupie Edwards and Lee Perry. For a while, Francis became their record salesman, frequenting the studios and getting closer to King Tubby, with whom he studied the technical aspect of music.

In the early 70s, Pat Francis started producing and founded his Teem label. On the refined rythm of Ain't no sunshine, Jah Lloyd performs an ample and energetic toast while the second side features a masterful version of the legendary trombonist Vin Gordon with the superb Rebel Rock. Great music. Muddy Ibe is legendary with his unique way of rendering his highlife.

He lives on. The dada is full of music, inspiration, composition and admonition. His genres include highlife, country, folks and world music. He had a unique voice that set him different from other highlife artists.

He always talked about enemy pursuing him in his song. Igbo highlife artists who had disagreements would use music to sub each other back in the days. Captain Muddy Ibe was a great man. The musical instruments he employed always make his songs unique and every head nods to the rhythmic patterns of them. Captain Muddy Ibe is dead but his son Otigba Ibe has taken the wheel of microphone after him.

Honolulu, Hawaii. This soothing audio head massage is much needed in these stressful times. Probably not. This one is. We had to reference three different sources to get the best sound: reels, vinyl and cassette. Operating from his lifelong base of Honolulu, Hawaii, Lyman and the musicians he worked with released a large quantity of albums over a near year period that brought his particular mixture of Polynesian sounds and Afro-Cuban rhythms to a wide audience, all across the planet.

Thanks to the efforts of Roger Bong's Aloha Got Soul label, we can now enjoy all that it offers once again, though vinyl and digital reissues. Given the contributions Lyman made to fantasy fueled sounds of exotica over the course of his lifetime, the album is drenched with subtle melodies that recall a litany of television shows, films and library music albums. If you need some time out, you'll find it here. Ersatz soundtracks for armchair safaris and shangri-las.

At the end of this month, Aloha Got Soul, will reissue the late, lamented, vibraphone and marimba maestro Lyman's last solo commercial recording, the LP Island Vibes.

A seamlessly segued suite of nine pieces, it consists almost exclusively of stripped back serenades for sampled, soothing, gently crashing, surf and Lyman's trademark instruments. There are no strings, no percussion, no orchestration, just harmonic hymns and lullabies hammered out by his virtuoso four felt mallets on metal and wooden tongues. The odd steel sheet is shaken to mimic the thunder of electrical storms, or the roar of the torrent of a secluded waterfall.

The even odder horn sounds, like that of an approaching pleasure cruiser, homing into view, heading for harbour, toward honeymoon hideaways, fantasy islands, and blue lagoons. When Martin Denny held a residency as hotel band leader in Honolulu — where he employed Lyman on vibes — the calls and cries of the local wildlife were incorporated, integral to their evening performances.

A welcomed sonic transport to paradise, much needed in a post- pandemic world. At eight years old, Arthur Lyman's music was already being played in public spaces via a toy marimba performance on the radio. While Lyman laughed about the experience, he would continue performing and ultimately debuted professionally at 14 with a jazz group. His skills earned him a place as a vibraphonist alongside exotica pioneer Martin Denny, although Lyman would Marie Jose - Various - Heartbeat Soukous (Cassette) the Denny's group soon after to pursue a solo career.

Posted by Jillem on Tuesday, September 28, Labels: Arthur Lyman - Island Vibes Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Niew Hip Stilen Simply fantastic For me, these guys were the best post-punk band from Rotterdam, maybe from Holland, way ahead of their time. It consists of multimedia works produced in conjunction with video art and dance theater between and The first track is "No 2," which has a deep repetitive hammer beat.

You would be very hard pressed to find anyone who has ever mixed those two things together better. He was the first real ambassador of Jamaican music worldwide, he was a voice of the third world — luckily for us, speaking in English, and that made him accessible to anyone in the rest of the world who spoke English and was willing to listen.

At first he was picked up in this country largely by working-class kids who could probably relate to the subject matter. Initially ska and reggae was mainly ignored or ridiculed by the mainstream and rock critics — maybe that was partly because Prince Buster was at the forefront of Jamaican lyricists, blatantly and unashamedly covering subject matter that was more or less unheard of in either Europe or America.

From ghetto violence and crime, to sex in detailfrom black power and black pride, to commenting on social injustice and poverty, from advocating freedom from colonialism and solidarity with Africa, to other important matters like ridiculing his musical rivals or consigning them to the boneyard, or describing the music on his own record itself and how good that was — nothing was off limits.

In that way lyrically he influenced hip-hop and a lot that was to follow the world over. Buster and some of his Jamaican peers were liberating the sort of real language and subject matter years before it would eventually become commonplace not just in music, but in mainstream TV drama and comedy. Stylisticallythe very idea of reciting over an instrumental backing track, which Buster was a pioneer of, became the basis of hip-hop years later when the Jamaican DJ Cool Herc introduced it to the Bronx.

Buster was really the first king of Jamaican music and started an international process which, with the help of its second king, made reggae probably the most popular music in the world, only to be eventually surpassed in popularity by hip-hop, a form which it had itself helped create. Myself and all the Two Tone bands owe him an enormous debt of gratitude. New York. Drawn from tapes recorded with King Tubby's Soul Syndicate band, the music included on 'Reckless Roots Rockers' is deeply ingrained with fissures of rhythm and dub melodies - bringing a vast array of talent to bear on some fabulously low-end material.

With much of the album recorded in Jamaica, there were plentiful tributaries on which to draw, as the likes of Jah Carlos, Bullwackies Allstars and Joe Morgan all make fierce appearances. Opening through the Reckless Breed's 'Dub Full Of Girls', we're immediately transported to a humid smoke-draped environ - as the familiar melody snakes its way through jaunty rhythms and an overarching sense of light that is a welcoming salve for a dark November night.

For those who know about such things, the inclusion of Don Carlos' deadly 'Jah Man' will be of particular note - with this particular slice of dub fortitude crafted over a rhythm double-take of Wayne Jarrett's 'Bubble Up' unavailable anywhere else and now rightly resurrected for appreciative audiences to rediscover, whilst dubs of Wackies' vast Black Harmony rhythm crops up throughout like a welcome friend throughout.

Elsewhere, 'Exposure' from the Sylvesters is a lithe and uncluttered beast, Bullwackies Allstars 'Creation' contains some demon rhythms, whilst 'Chin Chow' from Reckless Breed will have you nodding till Sunday. Posted by Jillem on Wednesday, September 29, Killer heavy roots business. Jah Lloyd, a. He looked the part of the artist down on his luck, his frame wizened by poor health, his gait slow; but his clothing was flamboyant and his eyes keen.

Sitting on a shady porch, he allowed me to turn his attention from his daily struggle for a living to his great works done twenty years before. He spoke about his songs with great care, almost tenderness.

We made plans to meet again, but by the time I returned to Jamaica he had died. A: Under the name Pat Francis. And then I form a group called Meditators. A: I was about say 16, We used to sing and practice with the guitar lots of nights before we could go to studio.

They used to have audition on Saturday where lot of artists come, then they pick the best from a lot of them. Out of a hundred they might pick 20, or 10 from that. At the same session I do two for Upsetter label.

Q: Back up for a minute. A: Yes. And I find that my voice could able to deejay. A: Jah Scuff. He just do that one song. He was never interested to do more. So I produce songs for a lot of artists like Heptones, Mighty Diamonds. A: Yeah it was my song.

Produced by me. North Parade Street. A: No. Douglas Boothe. He always say he was his brother, but then I find out it was not his real brother. Know ye that the Lord is God, cause He made us and not we ourself. We are His people and Marie Jose - Various - Heartbeat Soukous (Cassette) sheep of His pasture. So we take that song from there. And whosever believeth in Him shall never perish but ever live in light.

With spiritual rhymes. Of Rastafari. Which we intend might be God or Jesus. But his version was very good. I still admire the way he do it. Shenley Duffus first did that as adapted song, a do-over song, on Upsetter label.

I used to sell it in the shop. So we do that piece from that version. That mean a certain amount of respect due to your mother and father and elders.

It was a musical fight. So each time a artist come with a hit, you find something to answer back. But with love in our heart, we can show the world that there is no war. People who is not righteous do not bear much fruit, or good fruit.

Bitter fruit them bear. So, they are not governed by the spirit of God, or Jah. Q: When you did these great lyrics, did you sit down and work them out or…. A: That song came very quick, usually in those days songs came very quick to me, just like you hear the riddim, listen the riddim, and then [snaps his fingers] the inspiration just come. A: Yeah [pants several times]! And Scratch laugh and say he running from something, police want him or something. A: Yeah. I think it was Horsemouth [Leroy Wallace] playing a little melody.

You mean the world to me. It never press a lot but it a good song. It sound good. It could have sold a lot if I had press more. That was a nice one too. DJ version. A: [laughing] Jim Screechy mean when a man coming up on you dodging.

Hide and seeking. Not coming up full to you. Chat behind your back. So me say never do them thing deh. A righteous Rasta man never deal with that. Me and Scratch mostly used to put things together by-clipping through things that happening and take things from it. We do Colombia Colly and then we do a lot more songs, which is where I gone and do my thing from then.

And just hang on until now. He lift up my eyes onto the hills from whence come my help. I have come from Jah which made heaven on earth. By his protection the sun shall not smite me by day nor the moon by night. My group. And later for Rupie Edwards me and Joe Higgs sing it and he say him write it. I saw a canoe passing, which him row with two stick.

Me and Scratch mostly used to put things together by-clipping through things that happening and take things from it. We do Colombia Colly and then we do a lot more songs, which is where I gone and do my thing from then. And just hang on until now. He lift up my eyes onto the hills from whence come my help. I have come from Jah which made heaven on earth. By his protection the sun shall not smite me by day nor the moon by night. My group. And later for Rupie Edwards me and Joe Higgs sing it and he say him write it.

I saw a canoe passing, which him row with two stick. The old-time canoe, they row them with stick. Me used to love the sea Sunday morning time. Where it come from. They only sing it. And gone home. And the Congoes record it and say it is them write it. I have a lot of songs that I write which I never get credit for because I never know much about performing rights. But the rights of them, the original work, is mine. But we do some great works at Upsetter studio. Nuff songs.

Nuff song that people create them not even know where it come from. Scratch always had enough words. He called me Jah Lion. But he called me Jah Lion different from Jah Lloyd…. This interview was first published in The Beat in DanceCrasher would like to thank Mike Turner for giving us the opportunity to reproduce it.

Respect to Jah Lion. Francis began his singing career with the Mediators in the mids. At the end of the decade, he recorded for Rupie Edwards and Lee Perry. For a while, Francis became their record salesman, frequenting the studios and getting closer to King Tubby, with whom he studied the technical aspect of music. In the early 70s, Pat Francis started producing and founded his Teem label.

On the refined rythm of Ain't no sunshine, Jah Lloyd performs an ample and energetic toast while the second side features a masterful version of the legendary trombonist Vin Gordon with the superb Rebel Rock. Great music. Muddy Ibe is legendary with his unique way of rendering his highlife.

He lives on. The dada is full of music, inspiration, composition and admonition. His genres include highlife, country, folks and world music. He had a unique voice that set him different from other highlife artists.

He always talked about enemy pursuing him in his song. Igbo highlife artists who had disagreements would use music to sub each other back in the days. Captain Muddy Ibe was a great man. The musical instruments he employed always make his songs unique and every head nods to the rhythmic patterns of them.

Captain Muddy Ibe is dead but his son Otigba Ibe has taken the wheel of microphone after him. Honolulu, Hawaii. This soothing audio head massage is much needed in these stressful times. Probably not. This one is. We had to reference three different sources to get the best sound: reels, vinyl and cassette.

Operating from his lifelong base of Honolulu, Hawaii, Lyman and the musicians he worked with released a large quantity of albums over a near year period that brought his particular mixture of Polynesian sounds and Afro-Cuban rhythms to a wide audience, all across the planet.

Thanks to the efforts of Roger Bong's Aloha Got Soul label, we can now enjoy all that it offers once again, though vinyl and digital reissues. Given the contributions Lyman made to fantasy fueled sounds of exotica over the course of his lifetime, the album is drenched with subtle melodies that recall a litany of television shows, films and library music albums.

If you need some time out, you'll find it here. Ersatz soundtracks for armchair safaris and shangri-las. At the end of this month, Aloha Got Soul, will reissue the late, lamented, vibraphone and marimba maestro Lyman's last solo commercial recording, the LP Island Vibes.

A seamlessly segued suite of nine pieces, it consists almost exclusively of stripped back serenades for sampled, soothing, gently crashing, surf and Lyman's trademark instruments. There are no strings, no percussion, no orchestration, just harmonic hymns and lullabies hammered out by his virtuoso four felt mallets on metal and wooden tongues. The odd steel sheet is shaken to mimic the thunder of electrical storms, or the roar of the torrent of a secluded waterfall.

The even odder horn sounds, like that of an approaching pleasure cruiser, homing into view, heading for harbour, toward honeymoon hideaways, fantasy islands, and blue lagoons. When Martin Denny held a residency as hotel band leader in Honolulu — where he employed Lyman on vibes — the calls and cries of the local wildlife were incorporated, integral to their evening performances. A welcomed sonic transport to paradise, much needed in a post- pandemic world. At eight years old, Arthur Lyman's music was already being played in public spaces via a toy marimba performance on the radio.

While Lyman laughed about the experience, he would continue performing and ultimately debuted professionally at 14 with a jazz group. His skills earned him a place as a vibraphonist alongside exotica pioneer Martin Denny, although Lyman would leave the Denny's group soon after to pursue a solo career. Posted by Jillem on Tuesday, September 28, Labels: Arthur Lyman - Island Vibes Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Niew Hip Stilen Simply fantastic For me, these guys were the best post-punk band from Rotterdam, maybe from Holland, way ahead of their time. It consists of multimedia works produced in conjunction with video art and dance theater between and The first track is "No 2," which has a deep repetitive hammer beat.

In addition, there are nine other tracks, ranging from minimal music variants to odd-shaped electro, that are full of creativity. The members were involved in out-of-the-way improvisational groups such as the Jozef Kip Quartet and the local post-punk scene.

Highly recommended! Quite curious for me what is avantgarde jazz rock in collaboration with electrinika, and it was quite amazing indeed. Suitable to call their electronic creation is percussive and psychedelic, not danceable nor pop at all.

Rutger's flexible, human heartwarming really saxophone play completely sticks to the rhythm section "percussively". The combination of saxophones and synthesizers should be thought as the main dish in this album, let me say. Rutger's flexibility for managing saxophone can be heard via the sound texture, that sometimes sounds eccentric, sometimes sensual, sometimes primeval, and sometimes novel.

Maarten's inorganic whispering voices are funky spice for the production. And the rhythm section including percussive synthesizer punches is pretty precise and strict, never beaten by other instruments. Every other track, with the exception of B4, is an instrumental.

The first twenty five or so seconds of A3 feature the Zappa-on-crack totally unnatural syncopation of the techiest djent or avant-prog, using just a saxophone and what sounds like a Yamaha RX11 before the vocalist comes in and things get endearingly stupid. A guitar shows up on B1, and an electric bass shows up on B2, the latter of which is loaded with sound effects from a pinball game. I got curious and did some digging, and it turns out it's a table called Pinball Champ '82 from an Italian company called Zaccaria.

B3's a nine minute long track featuring a drum machine, an acoustic bass, and a piano. It's got mild smokey dark jazz vibes, but it's way, way too long and too repetitive. And that closer is segmented as follows: multiple unaccompanied overdubbed saxophones playing an almost liturgical theme, unaccompanied spoken word in Italian, the only time that language is spoken on the CDMarie Jose - Various - Heartbeat Soukous (Cassette) and saxophone, then the overdubbed saxes again.

It's very, very odd. Not like

Born In The 50s - The Police - Outlandos DAmour/Reggatta De Blanc (Cassette), Лица Меры - Многоточие - Dots Family Fuckt # 1 (Cassette), Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word - Herman Schoonderwalt - The Romantic Sax Album (CD), Pour Adultes, La Fesse 2, II. Nocturne - Rossini*, Chopin*, Nigel Kennedy, National Philharmonic Orchestra, Richard Bonynge -, Anything You Want To Be - Various - Slick City Shit! - 15 Years Switchstance (CD), Have You Ever Felt That Way - Monday Evening Stompers - Monday Evening Stompers (Vinyl, LP, Album), It Only Hurts For A Little While - The Jones Brothers (5) - Stop The Sun, Stop The Moon (Vinyl, LP), Crank It Up, Hot Child In The City - Various - 1978 (CD), Loves Gonna Live Here - Buck Owens - Live From Austin TX (Vinyl, LP, Album), Santa Lucia Luntana - Mario Lanza - The Ultimate Collection (CD), Donna - Dion DiMuci* - Donna The Prima Donna (Vinyl, LP, Album), La Gazza Ladra (Maestoso Marziale - [Allegro] - Più Mosso) - Rossini*, The London Classical Players*, Edvard Grieg, Karsten Andersen ・ Bergen Symphony* - Symphony (Vinyl, LP, Album)